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IBS tips for bloating symptoms

This is such an inconvenient and uncomfortable symptom, which can be distressing when you want to look nice in your clothes, and nothing in the wardrobe fits. Other IBS symptoms can remain hidden, but bloating stands out, literally.

 

Our IBS & DIET fact sheet has been designed to help people with symptoms of IBS, this has been devised by dietitian and IBS expert Nigel Denby. The Fact Sheet advises on how diet and lifestyle may affect symptoms of IBS, and contains helpful tips and meal plans devised for the main symptoms that are affecting you the most.

 

 

In the dietary section, IntestAid IB, of the website you will be able to complete our IntestAid IB Nutritional Challenge questionnaire, so we can email this factsheet to you.

 

Meal plan for IBS symptom – Bloating:

Breakfast

[list type=”3″]

  • Probiotic mini-drink
  • Bowl of wholegrain cereal with semi-skimmed or soya milk,
    top with sliced fruit or dried fruit
  • Slice of wholegrain or granary toast with jam/honey/marmalade
  • Drink

[/list]

 

Snack

[list type=”3″]

  • Piece of fruit
  • Drink

[/list]

 

Lunch

[list type=”3″]

  • Meat, fish, egg or vegetarian sandwich on granary bread
  • Piece of fruit
  • Probiotic yogurt
  • Drink

[/list]

 

Snack

[list type=”3″]

  • Cereal bar
  • Drink

[/list]

 

Evening meal

[list type=”3″]

  • Grilled pork chop with honey and mustard glaze
  • Mashed potato add a little wholegrain mustard if liked
  • 2 servings of root vegetables
  • Drink

[/list]

 

Tips:

[list type=”3″]

  • Avoid fizzy drinks – including sparkling water.
  • Avoid green leafy vegetables, onions, garlic, beans, lentils and pulses, these are renowned gassy foods and best avoided.

[/list]

IBS Dietitian’s tips for Urgency symptoms

This is a very upsetting symptom, which makes one avoid busy and hectic situations like rush hour at a station, where finding a suitable convenience may be difficult.

 

Our IBS & DIET fact sheet has been designed to help people with symptoms of IBS, this has been devised by dietitian and IBS expert Nigel Denby.  The Fact Sheet advises on how diet and lifestyle may affect symptoms of IBS, and contains helpful tips and meal plans devised for the main symptoms that are affecting you the most.

 

In the dietary section, IntestAid IB, of the website you will be able to complete our IntestAid IB Nutritional Challenge questionnaire, so we can email this factsheet to you.

 

Meal plan for IBS symptom – Urgency:

 

Breakfast

Glass of cranberry juice

Bowl of cornflakes/rice krispies with semi-skinned or soya milk

Slice of white toast with jam/honey/marmalade

Drink

 

Snack

Melon chunks

Drink

 

Lunch

Jacket potato (leave the skin) with tuna, prawns or cheese

Drink

 

Evening meal

Poached white fish with buttered new potatoes

2 servings of root vegetables

Drink

 

Tips:

Have at least 8 cups of fluid.

If you cannot give up tea and coffee use decaffeinated versions.

Experiment with fruit and herbal teas – fennel, ginger and peppermint are renowned for easing digestive upsets.

Avoid foods and drinks containing the artificial sweetener sorbitol.

What is the point to acupuncture?

I think most people are mystified by the notion of acupuncture. In the past it has often been conveyed as a wacky Far Eastern form of healing and pain relief that has no scientific explanation. This actually is far from the truth. Indeed, acupuncture can now be obtained, if you have the lucky postcode, on the NHS. Currently, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommends that acupuncture is considered as a treatment option for one condition: lower back pain1.

 

This year a researcher, Mark J. Zylka, a neuroscience (brain and nervous system) researcher at the University of North Carolina, announced that his research paves the way for “making acupuncture a hundred times more effective”. Zylka admits that he had never previously held in much regard acupuncture, because he thought there was no credible scientific explanation.

 

Previously, researcher, Goldman, and his team, found that needle stimulation caused the localized release of nucleotides and adenosine at acupuncture points, thereby reducing sensitivity to painful stimuli*. (Goldman et al: Adenosine A1 receptors mediate local anti-nociceptive* effects of acupuncture. Nat Neurosci 2010, 13:883–888.)

 

Zylka’s new research is all about advancing this knowledge that traditional acupuncture needles can stimulate the release of nucleotides in our body that convert into adenosine, which makes us less sensitive to pain. Nucleotides, and especially the nucleoside, adenosine, are the body’s natural painkillers. Nucleotides are found naturally in the foods we eat, and our body makes billions of them every day, for a multitude of vital purposes, not least to dull chronic pain.

 

Back to Zylka’s research! He has been working with an enzyme that makes adenosine in the body. This enzyme is used in hospitals, where it is injected into the spine, in order to provide pain relief for a few days. Because this is an invasive procedure, it generally is only used for those in excruciating pain. Zylka’s research uses this protein in combination with acupuncture needles, which act as the delivery system. The research of the team aimed to mimic the pain relief that occurs with acupuncture, but have it last longer. This research has been in relative small scale so far. But, with these enzyme injections applied in typical acupuncture fashion, successfully outlasting the pain relief of traditional acupuncture one hundred times over, more exhaustive research is bound to follow. The aim is to provide up to six days of relief, lasting even longer than a dose of anaesthetic, which typically only lasts a few hours. This research was published recently in the journal Molecular Pain; (Zylka et al, Molecular Pain 2012, 8:28 doi:10.1186/1744-8069-8-28).

 

Acupuncture is also used to reduce the painful symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), and is effective for some sufferers. There are registered acupuncturists2, who have been trained in the use of acupuncture techniques to reduce the symptoms of cramping, pain, and other IBS symptoms.

 

Perhaps we should also look at our dietary intake of these wonderful pain dulling nutrients, namely nucleotides. This could be a way of making acupuncture even more effective at pain relief for IBS sufferers. Some foods naturally contain high levels of nucleotides, offal, meat, fish, and yeast extracts hold the greatest content. Unfortunately, the Western diet generally does not include much offal, such as liver, kidneys and tripe. Such foods are predominant in the diet of the countries, such as China, where acupuncture is used as a front-line treatment. Could the higher content of nucleotides in the diet of people in the Far East be one of the main reasons why acupuncture is so effective and therefore so predominent in the Far East?

 

It is unlikely that many people in the West will be prepared to eat offal foods, so perhaps more consideration should be taken to supplementing the diet with nucleotide-rich health products, such as IntestAid IB or NuCell IM, which are formulated with purified nucleotides, including adenosine. Clinical research on health supplement IntestAid IB conducted using participants with the symptoms of IBS, showed a significant effect on reducing abdominal pain.

 

What’s the point, acupuncture? So, perhaps eating or taking more nucleotides as a health supplement is the ‘point’ for the effectiveness of acupuncture and supporting the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome!

 

1. NHS Choices http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/acupuncture/Pages/Introduction.aspx

2. British Acupuncture Council www.acupuncture.org.uk

3. British Medical Acupuncture Society www.medical-acupuncture.co.uk

4. Nucleotide Nutrition Ltd, IntestAid IB, NuCell IM www.nucleotidenutrition.com

IntestAid®IB on more UK High Street shelves!

Thanks to the phenomenal demand for our flagship product we are very pleased to announce that, as well as right here on this site, our customers can now find IntestAid®IB – the natural approach to supporting long-term Bowel Health – on even more shelves in their local high streets.

 

IntestAid®IB has been available from most larger branches of Boots, the UK’s leading pharmacy-led health and beauty retailer, since March 2009. In this time the number of Boots stores stocking IntestAid®IB has nearly trebled so you can be sure to find a pack in most prominent high street locations.

 

From 2012 onwards IntestAid®IB will be available in even more branches of Boots, currently 470, as well as all good independent health food stores up and down the country.

 

We are continually expanding the number of major retailers and the number of their branches that stock IntestAid®IB so be sure to check back here soon for more news on how to make it even easier for you to get your hands our unique bowel health solution.

 

If you would like us to inform you of your nearest participating retailer or if you have any problems finding a retailer in your area Contact us using our on-site contact form. We’ll be more than happy to point you in the nearest IntestAid®IB stockist to your location.